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1. About our company

FUJITSU CLOUD TECHNOLOGIES LIMITED is a Japanese private company that provides services in public cloud and other digital business solutions (i.e. machine learning). 

2. About our products

Satellite images are a prime example of big data. However, it is extremely difficult to extract data from satellite images. Therefore, we have started providing "Starflake".

It is a service that analyzes images taken by Earth observation satellites and processes the sizes and changes of various objects on the earth's surface into table data.

We deliver three key services 1) "Starflake nightview" to provide urban nighttime lighting, 2) "Starflake forest" to provide forest and vegetation index, and 3) "Starflake water" to provide water quantity. Our clients can get table data simply by selecting the area, period, and service they need.

3. Potential Users

  • Real estate agencies can analyze the feature of the area and use it to assess land prices and assets.
  • Retail companies can analyze local economic vitality and reflect it in their strategies and store plans
  • Institutional investors can leverage “Starflake” for novel investment opportunities and data-driven portfolio management.

For any interest in collaborations, feel free to reach out to us to the contact below.

Contact Us: datadesign@list.fjct.fujitsu.com


Ryo Kaneoka – Planner, Data Design Department, Business Design Division

* This article is provided by PASCO Corporation, member of the Japan Space Systems (JSS) under the framework of the MoU between JSS and EARSC signed in 2016.

1. About our company:

PASCO CORPORATION is a Japanese private company, providing geospatial information services to the global market.

2. Available Data: ALOS-2

PASCO distributes data and images acquired by ALOS – 2 (Advanced Land Observing Satellite 2: Daichi-2) satellite which is owned by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (hereinafter referred to as JAXA).

@JAXA

ALOS-2 is a satellite which is equipped with unique L-band radar sensor "PALSAR - 2". L-band has a characteristic that radio waves pass through vegetation and part of it reaches the ground surface. It is effective for the analysis or monitoring in vegetated area, for the purpose of Disaster or infrastructure monitoring and more. http://en.alos-pasco.com/

Data is distributed through Global partners.  http://en.alos-pasco.com/list/

3. Next Generation Data: ALOS-3

The ALOS-3 is a successor of the optical mission of the Satellite “DAICHI” (ALOS). The new satellite will achieve improved ground resolution (0.8 m) while observing a wide-swath (70 km) by a larger sensor with higher performance compared to DAICHI. ALOS-3 is planned to be launched in 2020. In the ALOS-3 project, PASCO will operate the satellite, distribute the data and provide related services.

@JAXA

Entering the European market with our EO data, we are keen to establish global partners. For any interest in collaboration, feel free to reach out to us to the contact below:

Contact us : haamja1465@pasco.co.jp
Hajime Zama - Manager, Business promotion section, Satellite business division.

MicroDragon, a made-in-Vietnam Earth observation satellite, was launched into space at 9:50 am in Japan on January 18 (local time).
The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) carried out the launch of MicroDragon along with six Japanese satellites using an Epsilon-4 rocket from the Uchinoura Space Centre in Kagoshima Prefecture, some 1,000 km away from Tokyo.

The Epsilon-4 rocket of the Uchinoura Space Centre in Kagoshima prefecture, which carried MicroDragon into space, before the launch (Photo: VNA)

The Vietnamese satellite was previously scheduled to enter space on January 17 but had to wait a day later due to unfavourable weather.

MicroDragon will be separated from the rocket after about an hour and send back first signals in one or two days. The satellite’s operation is expected to become stable after one to three months in space.

The satellite was developed by 36 Vietnamese engineers from the Vietnam National Space Centre (VNSC), who were sent to study space technology in Japan’s top five universities, namely the University of Tokyo, Keio University, Hokkaido University, Tohoku University and Kyushu Institute of Technology. The group began manufacturing the satellite in 2013 and successfully completed and tested it in 2017.

MicroDragon, measuring 50×50×50 cm and weighing 50 kilograms, is designed to monitor the quality of water in coastal areas, locate fishery resources, and observe changes in the ocean to assist the nation’s aquaculture. Also, it will help exchange data with the Microsatellite community in the world to enhance capacity in response to climate change and natural disasters.

Previously, VNSC engineers successfully made a satellite named PicoDragon (10×10×11.35 cm, 1 kg), which was launched into orbit in 2013.

As scheduled, after MicroDragon, Vietnam will make LOTUSat-1 and LOTUSat-2 satellites with advanced radar technology, each weighing 600kg and measuring 1.5×1.5×3 m with a 5-year lifetime in orbit.

Source

China launched two satellites for multispectral imaging on a Long March-11 rocket from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China at 1:42 pm on Monday.

A Long March-11 rocket carrying two satellites for multispectral imaging and two test satellites blasts off from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Cente21, 2019. (Xinhua/Wang Jiangbo)

The satellites have successfully entered their preset orbit, according to the center.

The two satellites, part of the Jilin-1 satellite family, were independently developed by Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd.

Loaded with a multi-spectral imager and an infrared camera, they will form a network with the 10 previously launched Jilin-1 satellites, providing remote sensing data and services for forestry, shipping and resource and environmental monitoring.

The launch also carried two test satellites. Lingque-1A is the first verifying satellite for the Lingque Constellation planned by Beijing ZeroG Technology Co., Ltd. It can take photos of Earth, conduct high-speed data transmission and inter-satellite communication.

Xiaoxiang-1 03 is a technology test satellite developed by Spacety Co., Ltd. based in Changsha, Hunan Province. It will be used to verify radio communication and small remote sensing experiments.

Source

Africa’s most advanced nanosatellite, developed by South Africa, was successfully launched on Thursday, the South African Department of Science and Technology said.

South African Minister of Science and Technology Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane congratulated the team behind this historic moment, saying the launch of ZACube-2 represents a significant milestone in the nation’s ambition to become a key player in the innovative utilization of space science and technology in responding to government priority areas.

“[Today] marks another historic milestone for South Africa with the successful launch into space of the continent’s most advanced nanosatellite to date, ZACube-2, in the early hours of this morning,” the department said in a statement.

The ZACube-2 took off at 04:07 a.m. with the Russian Soyuz Kanopus mission from Russia’s Vostochny spaceport, the statement said.

The cube-satellite, which left the earth together with small satellites from the United States, Japan, Spain and Germany, is orbited as secondary payload in a launch mission designed for real-time monitoring of natural and manmade disasters and other emergencies, according to the statement.

South African Minister of Science and Technology Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane congratulated the team behind this historic moment, saying the launch of ZACube-2 represents a significant milestone in the nation’s ambition to become a key player in the innovative utilization of space science and technology in responding to government priority areas.

“I am particularly excited that the satellite was developed by some of our youngest and brightest minds under a program representing our diversity, in particular black students and young women,” she said.

The ZACube-2 will provide cutting-edge remote sensing and communication services to South Africa and the region with a mission to monitor the movement of ships along the South African coastline with its automatic identification system (AIS) payload.

The satellite is a technology demonstrator for Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) that will provide critical information for South Africa’s oceans economy, the statement said.

“This satellite will help us monitor our ocean traffic as part of our oceans economy and also monitor veld fires and provide near real-time fire information ensuring a quick response time by disaster management teams,” Kubayi-Ngubane said.

Weighing just 4 kg, the ZACube-2 is South Africa’s second nanosatellite that has been launched into space and three times the size of its predecessor, TshepisoSat.

Pre Launch Report
SA ready to launch most advanced Nanosatellite
South Africa’s most advanced nanosatellite to date, ZACube-2, is scheduled for launch into space on 27 December, with the Russian Soyuz Kanopus mission from Siberia, Russia.

The ZACube-2 will be launched together with small satellites from the United States, Japan, Spain, and Germany and will be orbited as secondary payload in a launch mission designed for real-time monitoring of natural and manmade disasters and other emergencies.

ZACUBE-2, described as the most advanced on the continent, will provide cutting-edge remote sensing and communication services to South Africa and the region.

Weighing just 4kg, the ZACube-2 is South Africa’s second nanosatellite to be launched into space and three times the size of its predecessor, TshepisoSat. It is regarded as the continent’s most advanced cube satellite and is in fact a precursor to the MDASat – a constellation of nine nanosatellites that will be developed to provide cutting-edge very high frequency data exchange communication systems to the maritime industry.

The project, which is funded by the Department of Science and Technology (DST), supports Operation Phakisa. The DST’s entity, the South African National Space Agency (SANSA), in cooperation with the University of Montpellier, the French Embassy and the Paris Chamber of Commerce, manages the project.

In April this year, the Minister of Science and Technology Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane, attended the send-off ceremony and met the team young people who worked on the Zacube-2. At the time, the nanosatellite was scheduled for launch from India, in June 2018. Excess capacity induced by primary and secondary payloads on India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, resulted in a delay and an alternative arrangement was made.

“The launch of ZACube-2 represents a significant milestone in the nation’s ambition to becoming a key player in the innovative utilization of space science and technology in responding to government priority areas,” said Minister Kubayi-Ngubane.

The satellite is a technology demonstrator for Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA). It will monitor the movement of ships along the South African coastline with its automatic identification system (AIS) payload. The AIS navigational data will be provided to the South African Government in support of its broader Operation Phakisa initiative to grow our maritime economy. The satellite also carries a camera that will detect veld fires from space.

“This is the most technological advanced nanosat that will provide critical information for our oceans economy (Operation Phakisa). I am particularly excited that the satellite was developed by some of our youngest and brightest minds under a programme representing our diversity, in particular black students and young women.”

The ZACube-2 will be given a new name soon, following a national satellite naming competition launched in April by the South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement (SAASTA), an entity of the DST. SAASTA received over 300 entries from Grade 4-12 learners. The results have been finalised and the new name of the nanosatellite will be announced in due course.

MONDAY, 24 SEPTEMBER 2018

About 170 participants from national meteorological and hydrological services, government agencies and regional institutions in more than 50 African nations are attending the 13th biennial forum in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.

Data from EUMETSAT’s geostationary Meteosat satellites are a unique asset for forecasting the weather and monitoring the climate in Africa because of the satellites’ constant and detailed view of the continent. This brings a range of socio-economic benefits in areas including disaster risk reduction, agriculture, transport and water management.

EUMETSAT provides the satellite data free of charge to users in Africa, organises training and provides technical support through EU-funded capacity building programmes such as the GMES and Africa project led by the African Union Commission, which aims at transforming Earth observation data into services for sustainable development.

“This year, an important topic for discussion at the forum will be preparation for the use of data from the next generation of Meteosat satellites, Meteosat Third Generation, in Africa,” EUMETSAT Director-General Alain Ratier said.

“The first of these spacecraft is scheduled for launch in 2021 and will provide new and more data to users. For example, in addition to providing more frequent, more detailed images in more spectral channels, the satellite will map lightning flashes which will open a new era for meteorological observations of the African continent.

“Satellite data are an asset for many applications in Africa”

“EUMETSAT will continue to work closely with user communities in Africa, and relevant African and European institutions, to enable the best possible use of this data.”

A few days before the forum, the Bureau of the African Conference of Ministers in charge of Meteorology (AMCOMET) endorsed the “Abidjan declaration”, which supports increasing capacity in Africa to fully exploit data from the Meteosat Third Generation programme, and encourages the creation of an African Meteorological Satellite Applications Facility (AMSAF) to generate products that meet specific African needs.

“Satellite data are an asset for many applications in Africa,” Amadou Koné, Republic of Côte d’Ivoire Minister for Transport, said.

“With Meteosat satellites, we can predict extreme weather events and monitor climate change. This is crucial to help protect lives and critical infrastructure such as transport and energy facilities.

“Meteosat Third Generation will create new opportunities for Africa – lightning detection from space will be a vital source of information for aviation safety.”
Source

WASHINGTON, Oct. 4, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — NASA has launched a pilot program to evaluate how Earth science data from commercial small-satellite constellations could supplement observations from the agency’s fleet of orbiting Earth science missions. On Sept. 28, the agency awarded sole-source contracts to acquire test data sets from three private sector organizations.

NASA’s Earth Science Division in Washington issued blanket purchase agreements for the “Private Sector Small Constellation Satellite Data Product Pilot” program. Under these agreements, the agency purchases data sets and related products based on observations derived from Earth-orbiting, small-satellite constellations designed and operated by non-governmental entities.

“This pilot program is an innovative and efficient way for us to acquire, examine, and evaluate a wide range of private sector Earth observation data,” said Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Science Division. “As our very capable NASA research satellite fleet ages and more small satellites are launched by private industry, there are opportunities to leverage the strengths of each into even more complete climate data sets.”

NASA will provide the test data products to NASA-funded researchers, who will examine whether the data help advance the agency’s science and applications development goals. The pilot program is designed to determine whether these private sector observations and associated products offer a cost-effective means to augment or complement the suite of Earth observations acquired directly by NASA, other U.S. government agencies, and international partners.

The contracts were awarded to:

DigitalGlobe, a Maxar Technologies company headquartered in Westminster, Colorado, has five very high-resolution Earth imaging satellites (GeoEye-1, WorldView-1, WorldView-2, WorldView-3, WorldView-4) capable of collecting 30-centimeter resolution imagery.
Planet, headquartered in San Francisco, has three satellite constellations (SkySat, Dove, RapidEye) with more than 150 satellites supplying imagery and derived products over the entire Earth at medium and high resolution with high repeat frequencies.
SPIRE, headquartered in San Francisco, operates a constellation of over 60 satellites collecting radio occultation soundings, aircraft location information and ship reports. GPS radio occultation measurements can be used to sound the atmosphere for temperature, water vapor, and atmospheric pressure.
These contracts represent the first time that NASA has engaged with commercial small-satellite constellation operators to purchase their data for scientific evaluation. They establish a way for NASA to acquire and examine the data products during the next 12 months. Each contract includes an option for NASA to extend the agreement for an additional four years, for a total value of up to $7 million for each of the three agreements.

To be considered for participation in this pilot program, companies had to demonstrate they were currently operating a small satellite constellation of no fewer than three satellites in non-geostationary orbit and producing consistent global coverage. Companies also were asked to supply a comprehensive catalog of their data, describing areal coverage, data latency, pricing, and other factors.

NASA uses the vantage point of space to understand and explore our home planet, improve lives and safeguard our future. The agency’s observations of Earth’s complex natural environment are critical to understanding how our planet’s natural resources and climate are changing now and could change in the future.

For more on NASA’s Earth science activities, click here

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A NASA instrument that will measure ozone and other key pollutants over North America is seeking proposals for hosting services. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument, flying on a commercial satellite, will make observations from a geostationary vantage point, about 22,000 miles above Earth’s equator. TEMPO will be installed on the Earth-facing portion of the host satellite, allowing for an unobstructed view to collect measurements.

To accomplish this, TEMPO has partnered with the U.S. Air Force‘s Space and Missile Systems Center in El Segundo, California, and will employ its Hosted Payload Solutions (HoPS) contract. Proposals have been requested from the 11 commercial companies associated with the HoPS contract and they are due by mid-July. NASA expects the proposals to provide satellite integration, launch services and ground operations. The agency will make a selection in the late 2018 to early 2019 timeframe.

The TEMPO instrument recently completed a successful vibration test at Ball Aerospace and Technologies in Boulder, Colorado. The test verifies that it will survive launch and is one of three different environmental tests that are required for space flight qualification.

Source

China successfully launched two remote sensing satellites for Pakistan today, according to China’s Xinhua news agency. The satellites, PRSS-1 and PakTes-1A, were launched from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in northwest China at 11:56 a.m. local time.

PRSS-1 is China’s first optical remote sensing satellite sold to Pakistan. The satellite will be used for surveying land and resources, monitoring natural disasters, agricultural research, and providing remote sensing information for the China’s Belt and Road region. PakTes-1A is a scientific experiment satellite and was developed by Pakistan.

This is the first international commercial launch for the Long March-2C rocket in about 19 years.